Lab Test

Ceruloplasmin

Test Codes

Antrim #30235, EPIC: LAB6455, CERUL

Department

Chemistry

Specimen Collection Criteria

Collect: One Gold-top SST tube.

Physician Office/Draw Specimen Preparation

Let specimen clot 30-60 minutes then immediately centrifuge to separate serum from cells. Refrigerate (2-8°C or 36-46°F) the centrifuged collection tube within 12 hours of collection.

Preparation for Courier Transport

Transport: Centrifuged collection tube, refrigerated (2-8 °C or 36-46 °F). (Minimum: 0.5 mL)

Rejection Criteria

  • Grossly lipemic specimens.
  • Hemolyzed specimens
  • Plasma specimens.
  • Specimens that have gross bacterial contamination.
  • Specimens not collected and processed as indicated.

In-Lab Processing

Let specimen clot 30-60 minutes then immediately centrifuge to separate serum from cells. Deliver immediately to the appropriate testing station.

Storage

Specimen Stability for Testing:

Centrifuged SST Tubes and Microtainers® with Separator Gel
Room Temperature (20-26°C or 68-78.8°F): 12 hours
Refrigerated (2-8°C or 36-46°F): 7 days
Frozen (-20°C/-4°F or below): Unacceptable

Red-top Tubes and Microtainers® without Separator Gel
Room Temperature (20-25°C or 68-77°F): 12 hours
Refrigerated (2-8°C or 36-46°F): Unacceptable
Frozen (-20°C/-4°F or below): Unacceptable

Serum Specimens (Pour-Overs)
Room Temperature (20-26°C or 68-78.8°F): 12 hours
Refrigerated (2-8°C or 36-46°F): 7 days
Frozen (-20°C/-4°F or below): 3 months

Specimen Storage in Department Prior to Disposal:

Refrigerated (2-8°C or 36-46°F): 7 days

Laboratory

Dearborn Chemistry Laboratory

Royal Oak Automated Chemistry Laboratory

Performed

Sunday – Saturday, 24 hours a day.
Results available within 24 hours.

Reference Range

17-40 mg/dL.

Test Methodology

Immunoturbidimetric.

Interpretation

Oral contraceptives may cause elevated serum ceruloplasmin levels. Ceruloplasmin levels usually return to normal approximately five weeks after the contraceptives are discontinued. Ceruloplasmin levels may be 2-3 times normal during pregnancy. Normal levels return approximately 6 weeks postpartum.

Clinical Utility

Ceruloplasmin is the major copper-containing protein in plasma. Ceruloplasmin levels are increased in infectious diseases, pregnancy, and with the intake of oral contraceptives. Decreased ceruloplasmin levels are found in hepatolenticular degeneration (Wilson's Disease), severe liver disease, malnutrition, hereditary hypoceruloplasminemia, normal neonates, and Menke's "kinky hair" Disease.

Clinical Disease

Wilson's Disease is an autosomal recessive trait resulting in a copper metabolism disorder. It effects males and females equally. The onset of the disease is commonly seen in late childhood and early adult life. Affected individuals usually have ceruloplasmin levels less than 20 mg/dL. In these patients, free copper accumulates in selected areas of the body and may result in cirrhosis of the liver and central nervous system dysfunctions. These symptoms can improve with treatment. In untreated patients, the disease progresses and is usually fatal. Menke's Disease (also known as "kinky hair" disease) is a sex-linked disease that produces hypoceruloplasminemia. The disease affects only males and is characterized by steely hair, defective cross-linking of collagen and elastin, and neurologic findings. Menke's Disease is usually fatal within 3 years.

CPT Codes

82390
LOINC: 2064-4

Contacts

Last Updated

5/5/2021

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